Dyscalculia

If your child is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, then you are at the right place:-

 

  • Difficulty counting backwards.

 

  • Difficulty remembering 'basic' facts.

 

  • Slow to perform calculations.

 

  • Weak mental arithmetic skills.

 

  • A poor sense of numbers & estimation.

 

  • Difficulty in understanding place value.

 

  • Addition is often the default operation.

 

  • High levels of mathematics anxiety.

With homework, sometimes parents find that maths time is a difficult time in the household.

  • Feeling stressed

  • Your child doesn’t understand the concept

  • You sometimes don’t understand the concepts

  • Tears start because of the anxiety caused

Call ALED NOW for the your maths sessions

 

This is how the sessions work – Click here  

Also parents sometimes keep repeating some easily available technique on the internet, but many times it doesn't work and they get disappointed. The secret to success with such children lies in attempting different and innovative techniques and approaches.  Sometimes you have to totally change the approach. Our interventions have introduced many novel, innovative and simple, tools, games and hands-on tricks which are tried and tested by me successfully for many years.

 

Aled is at the cutting edge of ideas where he breaks down maths concepts into fun, understandable sessions, where children then enjoy the world of maths.

You would soon be amazed by your child respond and improvements in learning outcomes.

 

You must do this course if you dealing with children showing following symptoms-

  • Has difficulty learning and recalling basic number facts such as number bonds, e.g. 6 + 4 = 10.

  • Still uses fingers to count instead of using more advanced strategies (like mental maths)

  • Poor understanding of the signs +, -, xx and x or may confuse these mathematical symbols

  • Struggles to recognise that 3 + 5 is the same as 5 + 3 or may not be able to solve 3 + 26 ‒ 26 without calculating

  • Has trouble with place value, often putting numbers in the wrong column.

  • May not understand maths language or be able to devise a plan to solve a maths problem.

  • Finds it difficult to understand maths phrases like greater than and less than

  • Has trouble keeping score in sports or games

  • Has difficulty working out the total cost of items and can run out of money

  • May avoid situations that require understanding numbers, like playing games that involve maths.

 

 

 

Does your child have issues with

 

  • Problems identifying number words.

 

  • Trouble writing numbers. May reverse numbers.

 

  • Difficulty remembering and sequencing the steps involved in completing basic math calculations.

 

  • Dislike of math, avoidance of math homework

 

  • Difficulty learning to tell time.

 

  • Difficulty remembering number values and how numbers relate to each other.

 

  • Lack of development of the “mental number line”. May depend on physical methods of counting, such as counting on fingers, counting small objects, using touch math techniques, and so on.

 

  • Difficulty remembering the basic math functions of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing.

 

  • Problems naming math functions.

 

  • Trouble understanding and completing word problems.

 

  • Problems identifying money and remembering monetary values.

 

  • Trouble understanding fractions.

 

  • Dislike of math, avoidance of math homework

 

If you have answered ‘YES” to some of the above then we at Codex360 can help you.

 

At Codex360, Aled only works on a private basis with children who are in the following classes

 

  • Junior Infants and Senior Infants

  • Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, Class 4, Class 5, Class 6

 

OR

 

with children who are older BUT need assistance with to learn the basic understanding of maths concepts  

 

 

What is Dyscalculia?

 

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder where children have difficulty acquiring the mental processing skills required to complete math calculations.

They also display difficulty comprehending math concepts, including understanding numbers and math symbols, sequencing, grouping, counting and organizing. People with dyscalculia may also have difficulty with functional skills related to math, such as telling time or managing money.

 

What Are the Symptoms of Dyscalculia?

 

Dyscalculia affects a person for a lifetime. The two primary symptoms of the condition, which persist from childhood into adulthood, are:

  • Using inefficient and immature counting methods to solve simple math problems, such as counting on fingers

  • An ongoing inability to retrieve math facts from memory

More specific symptoms of dyscalculia are partly dependent on a person’s age. Here are some symptoms of dyscalculia by age:

  • Preschool (Age 2-5):

 

  • Difficulty remembering number names and learning to count.

  • Trouble recognizing patterns.

  • Difficulty knowing that a number represents a group of objects, i.e. the number 3 represents a group of 3 cookies.

  • Difficulty grouping objects that are the same.

  • Trouble understanding general concepts of quantity, such as more, less, etc.

  • Problems understanding how to sequence events.

  • Lack of understanding of general time concepts, such as morning, afternoon, today, tomorrow, days of the week, months of the year.

 

  • Primary School Age (Age 5-12):

 

  • Continued problems identifying and remembering number names.

  • Problems identifying number words.

  • Trouble writing numbers. May reverse numbers.

  • Difficulty remembering number values and how numbers relate to each other.

  • Lack of development of the “mental number line”. May depend on physical methods of counting, such as counting on fingers, counting small objects, using touch math techniques, and so on.

  • Difficulty remembering the basic math functions of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing.

  • Problems naming math functions.

  • Difficulty remembering and sequencing the steps involved in completing basic math calculations.

  • Trouble understanding and completing word problems.

  • Difficulty learning to tell time.

  • Problems identifying money and remembering monetary values.

  • Trouble understanding fractions.

  • Dislike of math, avoidance of math homework

 

  • Secondary School Age (Age 13-18):

 

  • Continued struggles with all math concepts typically learned in elementary school.

  • Difficulty with time management and prioritizing tasks.

  • Trouble understanding concepts of money quantity, i.e. how much money is enough for a purchase?

  • Chronically low grades in math.

  • Avoidance of math, low self-concept regarding math abilities.

  • Gravitating toward adaptive math techniques when offered, i.e. use of calculators and math apps.

 

  • Adulthood (Age 18+):

 

  • Continued difficulty with all math concepts and functions.

  • Trouble managing bank accounts and paying bills.

  • Continued difficulty with time management.

  • Gravitation toward careers that do not require a lot of math.

  • Reliance on adaptive math techniques and devices, such as calculators, banking apps, electronic organizers.

 

 

At Codex360, Aled only works on a private basis with children who are in the following classes

 

  • Junior Infants and Senior Infants

  • Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, Class 4, Class 5, Class 6

 

OR with children who are older BUT needs assistance with to learn the basic understanding of maths concepts  

 

 

 

Aled Hughes has many years of experience in this field and holds the following qualifications and experience -  

 

Co-owner of Codex360 where is invented the Codex360 MAT is one of the most recognised practitioners working with children with Dyspraxia / Developmental Coordination Disorder.

 

Specialist Movement Coach to John Paul  ( 5 year who does not run correctly due to muscle in- balances ) and up to the Irish Men’s Hockey team developing Speed & Agility.

 

Qualified teacher degree in Human Movement Studies

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Specific Learning Difficulties – NUI Galway 2019/2020

 

Entering Masters programme 2020/2021 in Specific Learning Difficulties

 

Handwriting without Tears qualified 2019

 

Dyslexia – identification and effective interventions  ICEP Europe 2019

 

Dyspraxia – identification and effective interventions Portobello College 2018

 

Garda Vetted – GCVU Reference Number 09/2242

 

BEd Hons degree in Human Movement Studies – qualified teacher

 

Aled has been specifically working in this field for over 30 years. At the heart of the interventions is “discipline” and “ consistency “. This works both ways as Aled is totally disciplined to helping your child and is consistently looking at ways to help your child. Every child is different and therefore every programme is individualized to your child’s needs.

 

Aled has always said that he is NOT the silver bullet or the magician that is amazingly going to fix your child. He is one solution to the issue BUT what Aled is skilful with, is getting children to work on skills that maybe they are negative with.

 

These parents think the same

 

“ My son is only 6 years old and has been struggling with maths from day 1 in school. It doesn’t come easy at all to him and he was recently diagnosed with DCD / Dysprxia also. Aled has worked miracles with our son as he makes the sessions so much fun and with the approach he uses he makes the intervention easy to understand, so that we can do the same at home. He has really improved and his awareness and understanding of maths is at a different level after Aled’s intervention. It is still a work in progress and that is why we are still with Aled doing private maths lessons.

 

 Yvonne, Foxrock, County Dublin

 

“ Aled was amazing with my son. He really did find maths and sums so difficult in school but Aled turned around his self-belief and confidence in maths. The way Aled breaks the concepts down into bite-size fun exercises was great and very easy to understand “

                                   

Paula, Blackrock, County Dublin

 

 

“ Olivia really struggled with 4th Class Maths and Aled went right back to the basics and convinced an 8 year old to do home exercises by herself every week to help her through her difficulties. Olivia does struggle with the whole concept of maths but now has a much bigger understanding of school maths and is a much happier young girl. Thank you Aled.

                                   

Katie, Stillorgan, County Dublin

 

What Causes Dyscalculia?

 

Dyscalculia as a condition has been repeatedly overshadowed by other neurological conditions and learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and delays in language development.

In fact, even though dyscalculia is estimated to occur in about 5% of students in the United States, dyslexia research appears in scientific journals close to 14 times more frequently than dyscalculia research (Ansari, 2019).

Researchers are now beginning to understand what causes dyscalculia. MRI studies have shown that math functions are centered in the parietal lobes of the brain. Children with dyscalculia show weaker activation signals in this part of the brain when completing math calculations.

In addition, these children showed weaker signals in the frontal lobes that handle working memory and executive functions that relate to organization (Von Aster, 2007).

This means that, in addition to difficulty completing math, children with dyscalculia may also have difficulty organizing their day, remembering materials, and completing other tasks that require executive functions.

 

How is Dyscalculia Different from Dyslexia?

 

The neurological patterns found in dyscalculia are similar to those found in dyslexia. A recent study compared MRI results of children with dyscalculia to children with dyslexia and children without learning disabilities. MRI scans were taken while the children performed math problems in a variety of formats.

While the children performed differently on the problems depending on the type of disability, the MRI scans of both the children with dyscalculia and the children with dyslexia showed very similar levels of activation of the parietal and frontal lobes. Both were weaker when compared to children without learning disabilities (Peters, et. al. 2018).

 

Even though patterns of brain activation are similar, the problems associated with dyscalculia and dyslexia are quite different. People with dyscalculia struggle with remembering math facts and completing math problems, while people with dyslexia struggle with reading due to difficulties decoding letters and words.

Both are included under the category Specific Learning Disability (SLD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5). In school, if your child is identified as having dyscalculia, he or she receives

services under the diagnosis of SLD. This is also true for children who have dyslexia.

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